Lovecraft Country– HBO Max Series Review


Odd, unsettling, and stoked in mystical mystery. Yes, HBO Max's Lovecraft country hits all the thematic elements of your typical H.P. Lovecraft novel. Adapted from the novel of the same name, Lovecraft Country is another first-class drama from HBO Max that is more than deserving of the critical praise that it’s receiving.

Lovecraft Country– HBO Max Series Review
Lovecraft Country

Lovecraft Country was produced by Jordan Peele, who's most known for his Oscar award-winning film, Get Out. Even though Peele only serves as a producer for the series his influence can be felt on the series’ tone and structure. Although in some places, it does not have the nuance and subtlety that you see in “Us” and “Get Out.”But then again, this is a different genre.

Lovecraft Country– HBO Max Series Review
Trouble finds them often

Taking place in the late 1950s, Lovecraft Country's story follows four African-American characters as they navigate the segregated United States in the 1950s. The overarching plot is kicked off when the lead, Atticus Freeman, receives a letter from his father after learning he’d gone missing. From there we follow Atticus, his uncle George and childhood friend Latitia as they travel to Massachusetts to find what had happened to Atticus’ father. From there the leads battle racism, cults, monsters, magic, and the sins of their forebears. Lovecraft Country’s story will have you on the edge of your seat, watching episode after episode.


Story

Lovecraft Country accurately conveys the deep-rooted institutional racism and complex race relations of segregated 1950’s America in almost every episode. But that’s not what’s impressive about Lovecraft Country. What is impressive is that Lovecraft Country shows the raw unfiltered racism of the time while constructing a complex magical mystery.

Lovecraft Country– HBO Max Series Review
Hooded figures are never good news